Readers’ Round Table of Books

Good morning, all! It’s LibertyCon weekend and the fifth Friday of the month. So we here at MGC are going to throw the door and the floor open — so watch where you step. Here are the rules. In the comments below, you can link to either a book you would recommend, a book you’ve written or something a friend has written. Only rules are to keep it PG-13 in the comments and please don’t flood the comments with your own work. Let’s let everyone play.

I’ll get it started off here with a list of books posted over at According to Hoyt this morning. After all, don’t we all need some good books to read?

Note: If you have more than two (I think it’s two) links in your comment, it will go to moderation and stay there until one of us has time to approve it. So keep that in mind. Thanks!

57 Comments

Filed under AMANDA, PROMOTION

57 responses to “Readers’ Round Table of Books

  1. I have another book on sale today not listed in the ATH post.

    Hunted
    http://amzn.to/2txQWtn
    When Meg Finley’s parents died, the authorities classified it as a double suicide. Alone, hurting and suddenly the object of the clan’s alpha’s desire, her life was a nightmare. He didn’t care that she was grieving any more than he cared that she was only fifteen. So she’d run and she’d been running ever since. But now, years later, her luck’s run out. The alpha’s trackers have found her and they’re under orders to bring her back, no matter what. Without warning, Meg finds herself in a game of cat and mouse with the trackers in a downtown Dallas parking garage. She’s learned a lot over the years but, without help, it might not be enough to escape a fate she knows will be worse than death. What she didn’t expect was that help would come from the local clan leader. But would he turn out to be her savior or something else, something much more dangerous?

  2. I will link to one book of mine
    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/207869
    Amazon warriors against musketeer hordes!

    The Holy Musketeers have found another continent to loot. The opposition? The primitive natives have no muskets and no cannon. Their cowardly men send their women to fight.

    The people of The One World face invaders with incomprehensible weapons and inscrutable objectives. Spears? Swords? City walls? Nothing stops the invaders from beyond.

    Between the Musketeers and the One World stands a single woman. Evaine is an amazon warrior and a wily strategist. Can even she defeat the Musketeers, or is civilization doomed?

    Evaine must contend with political infighting, assassins, magicians, mistrust, and gross political corruption, not to mention being outnumbered three-to-one.

    and the front book of what I think is a series novel, the best sequel I have seen to Wells’ War of the Worlds.

    Following the initial Martian invasion on England, President Theodore Roosevelt tries to prepare the United States for the potential of another Martian incursion. As the possibility of another, stronger invasion is increasingly clear; The U.S. government tries to mobilize nations to share information and technology to defend humanity. Newly minted ordinance officer Andrew Comstock has been placed in charge of developing new technology that has to be tested on the fly in a race against time if humanity is to survive.

  3. I am so tempted to put up links to my two shorts; not for promotion, but so that somebody would actually beat me about the head and shoulders! A newbie with no feedback will never be much more…

    However, other than trying to attach a video of my bookshelves, which in WP would probably just end up in tears – anything by the MGC people is well worth reading. New or old. Whip out that plastic!

  4. Alas, I’m currently reading my second theological / apologetic book in a row, and not particularly enthused by either. I’m likely to head for G.K. Chesterton after this, or C.S. Lewis.

    Thus the only thing I can recommend that would fit the moment is The Screwtape Letters:

    What? No link to my own stuff? First, they’re all on the short side. Second, I need to work on the covers. Third, I don’t feel comfortable flooding the comments with links. Not that there’s that many, but still.

    • At least put one up – we can always follow that to others if we want!

      • Deep breath:

        Here’s one:

        Henry Blighe is a rational man who never had any use for superstition. So what’s a rational man to do when he discovers he’s the victim of a family curse? Worse, what can he do when the only one who could remove it died centuries ago? That’s not going to stop Henry from trying to do something.. And he just might have a trick or two of his own.

        You can see why I need to redo the cover.

  5. I’ve only got this, and I really need to poke my publisher about getting an ebook version up. I’m working on getting more stuff together, though there’s other things I need to take care of first. (Hey, the front bathroom is finally painted!) (It’s not the painting, it’s the PREP that takes forever. Wayyyyyy too much wallpaper paste.)

  6. Good timing! I’ve got two book up for free this weekend and through the Fourth.

    Chris was seventeen when the genetically engineered were exiled to a parallel Earth, a wilderness devoid of humans.

    Fancy just wants a sense of taste, the government just wants her destroyed.

    • Hey, Mrs. Uphoff, are you able to do copy-edits to Fancy Free? There’s the usual minor typos, but you have one big whopper midway through the book.

      I only ask because I really love this story. It’s the kind of book that got me reading SF when I was a teenager. And I’m always really impressed when someone manages to pull off a good-versus-good story in the middle of an action adventure thriller AND writes a heart-warming romance that doesn’t bore my earrings off.

      If you want me to type up the copy-edits and send them to you drop me a line.

  7. Not going to promo anything at the moment (because… you’ll see). However, the next Colplatschki book will be out next month, and the first Shikhari (formerly RajWorld) book is in cover and edits at the moment, with plans for a September release. The next WWI book will be December release.

  8. Since I no longer have the daily train commute, my reading habits have shifted a great deal. I’ve promised/threatened myself with a goal of reading three books per week (alto, an omnibus would count as all three).

    I’m currently reading the last book in Landsay Buroker’s Fallen Empire series:

    Her books are nicely predictable — I always know that I’ll get a nice (semi-fluffy) read with a good mix of tension and humor/snark. Of the books that she’s published, I think only 2-3 have been a miss for me.

    Dug through my Nook and worked through Jay Allan’s Crimson Worlds: Refugees trilogy/omnibus:

    An AI gone mad that is determined to eradicate all of humanity, a number of crackpot schemes that work out better than they should (desperation is a wonderful motivator), and a satisfying end that has a small trailing thread …

  9. In terms of nonfiction, I recently finished Martin van Creveld’s A History of Strategy from Sun Tzu to William S. Lind.

    This is a brief review/survey of military strategy, and what I found most astonishing (& appalling) is how little true innovation there has been in the field.

    (seems to be two links that hit mod status; ah well — I’m also recommending LIndsay Buroker’s Fallen Empire series and Jay Allan’s Crimson World: Refugees).

  10. Dug through my Nook and worked through Jay Allan’s Crimson Worlds: Refugees trilogy/omnibus:

    An AI gone mad that is determined to eradicate all of humanity, a number of crackpot schemes that work out better than they should (desperation is a wonderful motivator), and a satisfying end that has a small trailing thread …

  11. Since I no longer have the daily train commute, my reading habits have shifted a great deal. I’ve promised/threatened myself with a goal of reading three books per week (alto, an omnibus would count as all three).

    I’m currently reading the last book in Landsay Buroker’s Fallen Empire series:

    Her books are nicely predictable — I always know that I’ll get a nice (semi-fluffy) read with a good mix of tension and humor/snark. Of the books that she’s published, I think only 2-3 have been a miss for me.

    (Mods: go ahead and delete the original comment w/ two links)

  12. Here is a amazon list of some of my favorates that I really need to update.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist/7QGYXYUKZYT7/ref=cm_sw_su_w

  13. Well, that’s an interesting new result for clicking on a cover!

  14. I will pimp two, one for others and one of my own.

    First up is And Then She Was Gone which is the first Clarke Lantham mystery by J. Daniel Sawyer. It was competent detective, medium boiled with a small sci-fi twist in the mystery that reminded me a bit of Reborn by Paul Wilson although without the supernatural elements. The ending was a tad disappointing as it tried a bit too hard to imply a series villain but the man story was resolved and was a tense page turner.

    The second is “The VIsions of Cireb”, a short science fiction ghost story by yours truly.

  15. Here’s my latest if anyone missed seeing the announcement about a month ago. Tanager’s Fledglings http://amzn.to/2tyesXi

  16. Draven

    I’ll take this opportunity to plug a particular short story collection of Sarah’s again:

    This collection includes seventeen short stories including “Something Worse Hereafter” which will unabashedly say made me sniffle and say ‘wow’ at the end.

  17. Stanley Miller

    Martin van Creveld’s Hitler in Hell is now available under the KU program, or for $4.99. I’m just starting it but I’m very happy so far.

  18. A pair of books I really enjoy is the Salvation War pair by Stuart Slade.

    They were never published but a draft is available online…

    Has anyone else read them or other of Stuart’s work?

    I much recommend them.

    They a based on the idea that God and the Devel and the angles and demons ate not gods but higher dimensional beings. They break their deal with humanity and come to take the earth back. War ensues. Good reads for military SF lovers…

  19. Maybe I should have stayed away today… Ah well, can’t work in the heat of the day anyway.

  20. Jake

    A book I am reading and enjoying right now is Witchy Eye by D J Butler

  21. I’d like to suggest two series of mysteries, one urban fantasy, one straight mystery.

    Ben Aaronovitch’s “Rivers Of London” series presents a very original take on magic and magical creatures, with a very likable protagonist and an oddball cast of supporting characters. Peter Grant is a mixed-race police constable who becomes an apprentice wizard and the lawman of London’s “demimonde”–the underworld of magical creatures ruled by the spirits of the Thames and her tributaries. A lot of thought went into the world building, it’s both fantastic and very down to earth.

    Chris Grabenstein’s “John Ceepak” series is a mundane police procedural series. I recommend it for the main character (who is not the narrator–the narrator is Ceepak’s rookie partner, much like the Holmes/Watson dynamic). John Ceepak is the opposite of the post-Serpico rogue cop who gets results by breaking the rules. Ceepak gets results by following the rules scrupulously and living by his code at all costs. Plus, it’s set in a resort seaside town which is an interesting environment for mysteries. The town is on the New Jersey shore, but it reminds me a lot of Myrtle Beach, SC–my favorite vacation spot.

  22. Mary

    New, just out!

    Through A Mirror, Darkly, a tale of superheroes and mirror worlds!

    • Mary

      The print book is percolating outward and should also be available. (And both are available at many other online vendors.)

  23. Mary

    In non-fictin, I also recommend

  24. I’ve been reading Barry Eisler this week. New to me – not sure why it took me so long to give his work a try, but it is EXCELLENT!

    https://read.amazon.com/kp/card?asin=B00M4LHQ82&preview=inline&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_ozWvzb6CQBV3Q

  25. Selling at InConJunction (local science fiction convention, would be within walking distance if the streets in question were walkable) has pretty much eaten up my day. So I’m coming to the party a little late.

    The Columbian Exposition has transformed Chicago into a vision of the bright shining future. However, the electric lights that turn night to day bring no joy to Kitty Hawthorne, and not just because they are the work of her employer’s chief rival. Now Edison wants her to abandon her investigation of Tesla’s alternating current system and look into a mysterious newcomer. Who is Samuel Gillian, who devises calculating machinery as easily as he builds flying machines?

    • Hmm. The link didn’t work. Let’s try again with a plain HTML link on the title:

      City of Blinding Light by Leigh Kimmel

      The Columbian Exposition has transformed Chicago into a vision of the bright shining future. However, the electric lights that turn night to day bring no joy to Kitty Hawthorne, and not just because they are the work of her employer’s chief rival. Now Edison wants her to abandon her investigation of Tesla’s alternating current system and look into a mysterious newcomer. Who is Samuel Gillian, who devises calculating machinery as easily as he builds flying machines?

  26. Let’s not forget Rex! Free, right over here, where Polly, a summer intern, learns that you can take on your dreams, with a pocket multi-tool and a heaping helping of Rex’s advice. Go for it!

    Perfect for that plane ride home from LC, too!

  27. I just started re-reading The Goblin Emperor last night, and I’m loving it as much as I did the first time.

  28. Another two books, the second being one of mine

    Sudetenland by George T. Chronis, with Cover design by Adrijus Guscia

    Review by George Phillies

    The review is available for $0 to $20 depending on source and format. This was George Chronis’s first novel; it is an alternative history set in central Europe in 1938. The focus of events is the Czechoslovak crisis and the partition of Czechoslovakia by the British, French, and Germans. Many of the characters, such as Chamberlain, Hitler, and Benes, are perfectly real people. As we work through the lower levels of the Czechoslovak military, it would take someone with more historical knowledge than I to say who is real and who the author needed to create. We made a series of diplomats, military officers, and military intelligence officers. Even major Major Charles de Gaulle makes a pass-through, lecturing on the utility of tank forces. Relative to reality, he is more than a bit enthusiastic.

    A second set of characters are the half-dozen news reporters who wander about doing coverage. So far as I can determine most of them are not real. The first person we meet is Ros Talmage, that rare avis of 1930s journalism, a female reporter. Her boss sends her to Europe, apparently to cover Paris fashions and whatever else she finds in her spare time. She ends up in many of the right places at the right times. There are other reporters from other nations, Sanderson, Endicott, and others, one of whom appears – to all his colleagues – to be quite smitten with Talmadge, and vice versa. However, this is the 1930s, and she is an American, so the two never do anything except affect disinterest in each other. Central Europe is not like America. One of the reporters is amazingly good at being in the right place at the right time. He does not, however, at any point introduce himself as ‘my actual name is James, James Bond’ but that would not be surprising.

    Now we approach the history. Alternative history novels have a range of accuracies, from the Gingrich-Forstchen Gettysburg series down to the not-to-be-named author who referenced ancient carpets woven by Norsemen from strips of linoleum. So far as I can tell, this novel is very much at the top end, especially in his research on the actual capabilities of the 1938 German and Czech armies. At the front, we see our historical time line evolving. We see considerable detail on people now long forgotten, notably the German Henleinists creating disorder in the Sudetenland. At some point, woven in so subtly that I didn’t see it, history diverges and war breaks out. The Czechs are facing the German army of 1938. German training is weak. Almost all the German tanks are the models 1, 2, and 3, which were significantly to laughably inferior to the Czechoslovakian army’s tanks, especially the T38. German munitions production was at best just beginning. First the French and then the Russians keep their treaty commitments. I shall not present a spoiler, indicating the plot result, but a sequel is planned, arising from an extremely different 1939.

    The writing and editing are first-rate. Events keep progressing. When the armies collide, there is fine detail on the strengths and weaknesses of each side, in what appears to be a plausible manner.

    Minutegirls…
    http://http://3mpub.com/phillies/minutegirls.htm

    Nice young women
    who just want some good clean fun
    with power armor,
    plenty of high explosives,
    and a few cute Minuteboys.

    It is 2174.
    From the hills of American Manchuria
    to the depths of Outer Space.
    America’s Girl Militia
    battles Franco-German Treachery
    to shield the American Stellar Republic.

  29. Just one more…it’s really good!

  30. I’m re-reading the Count to the Eschaton series by John C. Wright. They’re so chock-a-block full of cool stuff that when the new book comes out, it’s actually more fun to go back to book 1, Count to a Trillion. Also when you’re no longer flipping the pages avidly to find out what comes next, you’re more likely to get all the wry humor in Hermetic Millenium.

    By book 3 you’ve gone for AD 2200-ish to 70,000 and it all makes sense.

    By the way, if you’re still not wanting to fund the wankers at Tor, it’s easy to find a decent hardback on Amazon and go and put a few bucks in the author’s patreon account: https://www.patreon.com/JohnCWright