More good advice from elsewhere

While there are a lot of very, very good resources out there, finding them can sometimes be an issue. So let me throw a few more out there for you.

First off, J K Rowling talks about failure – artistically, employment-wise, and in life. Because trying to succeed in the creative arts is going to involve failure, and adversity.

Second, Neil Gaiman on being a successful artist. This speech has been cut down and reprinted under “Make Good Art.” However, the full speech is full of a lot more interesting bits of advice, including valuable business advice and career advice, both when dealing with the problems of failure, and on dealing with the problems of success.

For a legendary rant, Harlan Ellison on paying the writer. It’s profane, (as Harlan usually is), but it’s referenced a lot. Now you’ll know what people are referring to!

And finally, not a video, Kris Rusch explains some scary concepts on what really happens if an agent negotiates a contract – hey indies! This’ll include foreign rights negotiations!

Business Musings: My Agent Will Negotiate (Contracts/Dealbreakers)

That’s all for this week!

7 Comments

Filed under FYNBOSSPRESS

7 responses to “More good advice from elsewhere

  1. That last one… Oh my! But I can’t say I’m really surprised… Agents with a ‘stable’ of people don’t usually manage each account with the same attention to detail.

    • fynbospress

      There are always favourites, but the asides show just how deep the rot goes. (Kris sat on this post a few months to anonymize it, and has already racked up, what, eleven more instances more of this behaviour?)

      The comments are pretty valuable, too, as people add bits of hard-won wisdom.

  2. Good reminders, all. And even indies may have to deal with agents somewhere along the line, and should read and support Kris for her commitment to putting these posts online – even if we don’t need them this minute.

    Agents can only get away with practicing law without a license if authors allow them to; with publishers now grabbing so many rights, and writers conscious of how few slots publishers have, there is a real squeeze going on. I’m glad not to be in it – but I can’t predict the future, and if I ever have an agent, at least I won’t be a lamb led to slaughter without at least digging my heels in.

  3. Thomas Wicklund

    There is something ironic about the Harlan Ellison rant “always pay the writer” being posted in a blog which (I believe) does not pay its writers.