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Posts by Dorothy Grant

Writing Guns, The 10,000 Foot View by JL Curtis

Today’s guest post is by J.L. Curtis, who blogs at Old NFO, and writes awesome contemporary westerns with cowboys vs. drug smugglers, as well as science fiction.

Get your guns…

Right.

A 10,000 foot view…

First, forget everything you’ve ever seen in the movies, it’s all BS! Read more

Continuing Education

There’s a flat spot of no new words on my NaNo graph. (A couple, actually). There’s a book for Margaret Ball that I’m… a month? ack! overdue on writing a blurb for. (Yes, more mathemagics coming!) There’s a writing class that I just threw up my hands and skipped turning in the assignment, and went and got some sleep instead. And let’s not even talk about the state of my kitchen floors, or the way I’m failing to make the gym coaching sessions I paid good hard-earned money for.

Welcome to adult life, eh? But why did I even get into this writing class in the first place, much less NaNo? Because I looked around, and realized a basic truth – nothing alive is static. If you’re not learning, then you’re not growing, and if you’re not growing, you’re dying. It’s too late in the year to pick up glider lessons, so I’m going to concentrate on warmer, indoor pursuits.  Read more

New Book Out from Margaret Ball!

More mathemagics for your reading pleasure!

Link: A Creature of Smokeless Flame for those of you with adblockers/scriptblockers!

Thalia Kostis and her cohort knew the CIA was funding their group of research mathemagicians, but they’d never demanded results like this before! After terrorists use magic to kidnap hostages from the agency’s headquarters, the Center for Applied Topology finds themselves torn from their cubicles and dragged across three continents, from holding cells to terrorist safehouses as the superiors who never believed in them before are now demanding impossible results.

Now academics who can’t organize a donut run are finding out there are worse fates than loss of funding… If they don’t find and stop the magicians responsible, they’re going to lose their lives!

Get it on Amazon today!

The problems of success

As pointed out last week, Mad Genius Club has been around for over 10 years, now. This means it’s older than the average career of a fiction writer… and more than twice the lifespan of the average indie writer. The advantage of a group blog is that as writers get burned out, they can take a break or leave, but the group is still here – and thanks to Dave Freer, Sarah Hoyt, and Amanda Green holding down the cornerstones and surviving through it all, this place is still awesome.  (Check out their books! Good stuff, and thanks to long careers, they have lots to choose from!)

As the bloggers and commenters have been here a while, the questions start to change. Starting out, the problems are simple, clear, and everybody has them. How do I tell the story in my head? How do I get published? How do I get noticed? But when you’ve been around long enough, you have the problems of success, and the problems of having a career. When and how do I end a series, and how do I minimize the impact to my income, and draw readers to other books? When do I rebrand all of my covers, and rewrite my blurbs? What are the advantages and disadvantages of anthologies, or of going hybrid? How do I get my rights back? When is it time to incorporate? What provisions do I make for a literary trust in my will?

Read more

Seasonal Releases

When is the best time to release and promote your books? Usually, indie authors look at me and say “Uh, when they’re finished?” or they start thinking about staggered serial releases. But in our wonderful world of not planning releases a year out, there’s an interesting question: when do you release Holiday-themed or seasonal books? We all know the outcry when Christmas decorations appear in the store before Halloween, but is it better to release a Christmas romance before in early November, or early December? Read more

Prepping for Research

We’re late! We’re late! For a very important date! Or post on MGC, anyway. We are not late yet for taking off on a research trip, which is going to involve multiple museums, and a good chunk of the trail that Walt Ames is going to travel with some horses back in 1870-something (Peter could tell you the exact year. Just as he can tell you exactly who was in command of every little border post and fort, and when they left on the trip, so Walt Ames can do a deal that’s more amenable with their fill-in…) Read more

It’s all in how you look at it

Point of View

How many of you here have started something in first person, only to go back and redraft it as third? Or third person redrafted to first?

Or figured out you were in the wrong person’s head, and had to restart in a different head?

Read more